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about what can and should be done. we are glad you have joined us. >> every community has a martin luther king boulevard. it's the cornerstone we all know. it's not just a street or boulevard, but a place where wal-mart stands together with your community to make every day better. >> nationwide insurance supports tavis smiley. with every question and answer, help tavis improve financial literacy and remove obstacles to economic empowerment one conversation at a time. nationwide is on your side. >> and brought to you by the aarp foundation. >> wk kellogg foundation. improving the lives of a vulnerable children. wkkf.org. >> of the annie e. casey foundation, helping build a better future for america's kids and families. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. [captioning made possible by kcet public television] tavis: even before the name -- numbers came out, we decided to spend some time getting to know the people behind the pottering -- poverty statistics. cornel west joined us. in tonight's episode, we call this one suffering, we look at what
in rather than go through a long introduction about the importance of privacy and security. some of us were here last year and sought a lengthy and informative panel about privacy. a lot has changed over the course of the year. we have seen security incidents and interest on capitol hill. we have seen a lot happening in the private space from new bills to new efforts on the part of industry to respond to consumer concerns. how much have the landscape change in the last year? where do you see things going in washington? >> it is great to be here to see everybody. i think a lot of progress has been made by the business community in developing tools to give transparency and choice to consumers and explain to them all the benefits of the use of personalization and information after the information agents. the effort i am most closely associated with is the digital advertising alliance which is an effort remember of the leading trade associations in the united states, direct marketing association, association of national advertisers, network advertising initiative and many others developed princ
, the u.s. chamber of commerce, and the brookings institution discussed the role of the u.s. government and the imf, and the implications for the u.s. economy. this is two hours. >> hearing today is on the year zone debt crisis and implications to the united states. ask unanimous consent mr. lynn of massachusetts and mr. greene from texas both members of the financial services committee can silt in with the must members of the subcommittee today for purposes of delivering a testimony and asking the witnesses questions today. we limit time to 10 minute, and i recognize myself for as much time as i might consume. today we're focused on the eurozone debt crisis and impact on the u.s. economy. despite the systems, the e.u., international monetary fund, imf, greece, portugal, and italy plunged into the deep this year. the economies show sign of strain. in the past year, there's a series of credit rating downgrades for many e.u. members following the grounds of stress tests on important european banks. these rating agencies warned about the risks associated with the global connectedness of ba
that did so much for this country, let us draw strength from those earlier struggles. first and foremost, let us remember that change has never been quick. change has never been simple or with without controversy. change depends on persistenceç. change requires determination. it took a full decade before the moral guidance of brown vs. board of education was translated ininto enforcement measures of the civil rights act and the voting rights act. those 10 long years did not lead dr. king to give up. he kept pushing, speaking, marching, until change finally came. [ applause ] >> the president: and then when even after the civil rights act and the voting rights act passed, african-americans still found themselves trapped in pockets ofç poverty across the country. dr. king didn't say those laws were a failure. he didn't say this is too hard. he didn't say let's settle for what we got and go home. instead, he said, let's take those victories and broaden our mission to achieve not just civil and political equality, but also economic justice. let's fight for a living wage and better school
. >> good morning, everyone. a beautiful start for us on this sunday. fog has burned off. it is 59 degrees. after the cool start in the 40's, it is 59 at the airport. the humidity 78%. barometric pressure nice and high. the high temperatures this afternoon up around 80 degrees. we'll check the seven-day forecast when i come back in a few minutes. >> our big story this morning is a bleach fight in baltimore county. the hazmat team had to be called in and the entire store evacuated. >> 19 people were rushed to the hospital. sheldon dutes has more on what happened. >> i wasn't really scared, but i have a baby so i had to get out. >> the shong trip was cut short after a fight between two women spiraled out of control. around 11:00 in the morning, theresa jefferson followed a woman into the arbutus store. >> a suspect grabbed whatever she could grab at the time, and she grabbed bleach and a bottle of ammonia and poured these on the victim as she was assaulting the victim down on the ground. continued to pour these on her. >> they said they needed to evacuate the store. >> the problem was if it
in the insurance government, fisheries, and forest sector. the u.s. starts green buildings in china. my question is is the investment bank ceos working diligently to launch these securities all got fired because of the credit crisis, and do you have thoughts on how to get their attention again at the banks? >> i'm not spending a lot of time on banks these days, and i think what you need to ask is not so much -- i think you can assume that banks will be involved when there's a real demand and the proper incentives, and so when we start looking at green buildings or all series of other environmentally fiesht products, i think what you need to do is let's just start with government policies. i think you need proper government policy, and i think that companies need to hear from their investors, from their customers, from their employers, and i think that's why most major companies do these sorts of things they do when they do positive things that have a beneficial impact on the environment, and they think it's good business, and i think that -- and i think markets develop when there's a demand and
project on u.s. prohibition. later, stephen tankel of american university joins us to discuss pakistan and global terrorism. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2011] host: house and senate members are back in washington this week with a vote to keep the government running for six weeks scheduled in the house today. yesterday the senate moves forward on a bill to punish china for keeping the value of the currency lower. and on capitol hill, federal reserve chairman ben bernanke will appear before the joint economic committee at 10:00 a.m. to discuss operation twist, the next efforts to boost the economy. live coverage on c-span 3 this morning. president obama will travel to texas to stump for his jobs bill, pledging monday to personally lobby congressional leaders to pass legislation. we will begin with campaign 2012 this morning and get your perspective on a presidential bid from new jersey gov. chris christie. he has not said if he is in or out but we want to hear from all of you this morning. we also have a fourt
for joining us today. >> thank you very much. >> tell us a little about your background, where you grew up, went to school and the kind of jobs that you worked. >> most of my adult life i spent completely here in san francisco. now about 27 years. i was born in chicago. my father had emigrateford iran to go to school in chicago, where he met my mother while he was attending the university of chicago. that's where i was born. after my parents had divorced, i spent most of my youth in the state of rhode island, southern rhode island, and then after i graduated high school, i went to undergraduate college in st. louis, missouri and then came out here for grad school, which fell in love with san francisco bay area. all of my plans changed and this became my home. i worked as an environmental analyst for a number of think tanks and then applied that trade in law enforcement, where i went to the san francisco police academy many, many years ago, graduated as a academy class, president of the class. trained in environmental forensics, both here locally, state and federally by the usepa in the tra
. congresswoman, thank you for the time for being with us. >> erin, it's wonderful to be with you. thank you. >> let me start with vice president biden this morning on abc. he was talking about the terror plot, he said it was an outrageous act and the iranians will have to be held accountable. that's the quote. if you were president, would military action be on the table? >> if i was president, i wouldn't have taken my eye off the number one issue in the middle east, which is iran obtaining nuclear weapons. the problem with the obama administration is they have put significant daylight between israel and the united states from day one of the obama presidency. the president unfortunately sent signals of weakness and focused on israel building apartments on their own land as opposed to iran obtaining a nuclear weapon. that's been the problem. when you have a nation that's a hostile nation, seeing the united states from a point of weakness, that can lead to actions that are absolutely heinous like we're seeing today. >> does it seem like there's a lot of confusion or uncertainty how high this g
graduate is indicted in a terror plot. they said he tried to use remote controlled planes to attack the white house and capitol. he has a detention hearing on monday. >>> florida has decided to buck gop rules and move its primary date up. that's wreaking havoc with the republican primary calendar. yesterday florida republicans announced they are moving the state's presidential primary to january 31st. iowa, new hampshire, nevada and south carolina have vowed to move their nominating process ahead of florida to protect their early voting status. >>> and astronaut mark kelley's retirement from the navy took effect today. he was a test and combat pilot before commanding nasa space shuttle flight. in june kelly said he wanted to spend more time with his wife, arizona congresswoman gifford gifforgiffords. >>> 15 people in eight states have died after eating tainted cantaloupe cantaloupes. it was traced to jenson farm. the cdc says it can take weeks before symptoms occur and the death toll could rise. >>> now back to our top snow shower information emerged about the men who were with anwa
shanker and eric schmitt look at how the u.s. government has been fighting al qaeda since 2005, the year the strategy of the u.s. had been using the previous four years was change. this is just over an hour. >> good morning everyone. welcome to the miller center form. today we are thrilled to welcome thom shanker and eric schmitt to the nation's most accomplished journals covering national security and military affairs. and the authors of "counterstrike," the untold story of america's secret campaign against al qaeda. those oath of them spent roughly the last year as writers and residents of the center for new american security. thom shanker joined "the new york times" in 1997 as assistant editor and is currently a correspondent covering the pentagon and national security including efforts of transformation within the pentagon and the global campaign against terrorism. prior to joining the times mr. shankar was a foreign editor of the chicago trip and in berlin and moscow euro chi. eric schmitt is a senior writer for the nric times who has spent, who is written about the military and nat
in 24 countries. we use that also with the department of defense for guidance and advice and coordination. in this context as well if you have the state department helping to do diplomatic coordination or doing also assistance as far as money-wise to provide logistical support and, of course, the dod is providing the actual individuals to do some training and equipping, so those are issues that were kind of a model for this area, but also we're looking at other areas in parts of africa. >> thank you very much. >> thank you, madam chair, i yield back. >> thank you. >> thank you very much. ambassador, i read your report, and i'm a little confused in it. at one point on age 4, you refer this is nothing more than that what we already do with the afr africno thin we have place in africa, and i studied it, and unless i'm wrong, it's an educational thing we use to help african nations to develop a more professional military. we do building of schools and hospitals on the ground, but you add in the report the reason we had to go, the president had to go to congress is because the
.com/preferred. >> gregg: hello, i'm gregg jarrett. glad are with us. >> i'm heather childers. topping the news this hour. hundreds of protestors out on the streets and some of america's biggest cities across the country angry at wall street and lack of jobs as the president prepares to hit the road again. >>> going, going, gone a lavish symbol of moammar khadafy repressive regime. >> heather: remembering the man with a moving ceremony today. >> a hurricane may have delayed this day. this is a day that would not be denied. for this day we celebrate dr. martin luther king, jr. return to the mall. >> gregg: a monument of stone honoring martin luther king, jr. transformed to a living memorial. kelly wright and joins us live. how are people describing what is certainly a historic day. >> reporter: they were saying this was a historic occasion. thousands of people coming to washington to attend the celebration of dr. king's life, dream and legacy. joyful crowd even going hand in hand as they sang "we shall overcome." a song that became the signature song during the struggle. as the song echoed throughout the
about the trial of michael jackson's doctor, conrad murray, so he goes behind the headlines with us. >>> and also behind the headlines, the unemployment rate at 9.1%. the fed chairman recently saying the economic recovery is, quote, close to faltering. millions of americans are worried about their savings, how they're going to support their families, whether they'll have enough money to retire. coming up, we're going to get you through your financial emergencies in today's "money 911. o of". >> all right. >> good. ann sold the olympic torch and now prayer beads given to her personally by the dalai lama. >> you know, she asked me to be generous and it's for charity. >> let's go inside to the news desk. >> giving me a hard time for donating -- how about a beaded head? >> thank you, matt, ann and al. good morning, everybody. amanda knox is back in the u.s. this morning after four years in an italian prison. nbc's stephanie gosk is in seattle with more. stephanie, good morning. >> reporter: good morning, tamron. she spent 1,450 days in that prison. but it only took 30 hours to get her b
into law is designed to protect teenagers from skin cancer. kara joins us live to talk about new tanning bed restrictions and why it is landmark legislation. >> reporter: that is because california is the first state to ban minors from using tanning beds. texas has a law for kids under the age of 162. california is the first to set the higher age limit. 28million people use tanning beds each year. 2million of them are teenagers. research shows those using the tanning beds before the age of 20 double the risk of developing melanoma. more than 8,000 new cases of melanoma will be diagnosed in california just this year. the golden state had previously banned minors under the age of 14 but allowed those between 14 and 18 to use the beds with parental consent. if everyone knew the true dangers of tanning beds they would be shocked. we are going to talk to tanning bed owners to see what they think of the law and see what the alternatives are for the teens. live in san francisco, ktvu channel 2 news. >>> san jose police plan to release the names of the victims in a double homicide. kraig is in
deeply to us here in the united states because our country has no bigger more important economic relationship than we have with europe. while the direct exposure of the u.s. financial system to the most vulnerable countries in europe is limited, we have substantial trade and investment tries with europe and european stability matters greatly for american exporters and for american jobs. already the crisis has slowed growth significantly in europe and around the world as increased uncertainty and red e reduced risk appetite, undermine business and consumer confidence and reduced household wealth. there are downside risk to the outlook for the u.s. economy and job creation. it is vitally important to the united states that europe is able to address its issues effectively and in a timely fashion. for this reason the administration has closely engaged with european leaders to encourage them to move forward in an effective way. at the same time, our supervisors have for some time been working closely with the u.s. financial institutions to identify risks and to improve their ability
't want to work, you're just lazy and you are just irresponsible. they used to say lazy and shiftless. they did blame themselves. that's would you we're organizing and mobilizing all over america. mr. cain, we're going to change things, because we're going to start blaming ourselves for not doing more. joining me now, from wall street michael mulgrew, president of the united federation of teachers. michael, how does it look? >> it's looking night. i have to tell you, this is an amazing thing that's going on. two days ago we sent out notices, expecting a couple thousand of people. there were over 15,000 people easily filling up the square and marching down broadway. people say enough is enough. we want fairness, we're going to stand up until we get it. >> now, the fight is about economic inequality. i remember not long ago you, i and others marched down, talking about unions. now you are there, as unions supporting the occupy wall street. this seems to be taking form for those that have variety of political perations, but are united around 1% of this country should not be controlling t
broadcasting. >>> welcome. i'm sitting in for bob agger nethy. thank you for joining us. a federal judge upheld most of alabama's controversial immigration law. they ruled police officers can be required to check the immigration status of anyone they suspect is in the country illegally. public schools must check the status of students. the part of the law opposed most vigorously by many religion groups was struck down. christian clergy outlawed transporting or harboring illegal immigrants and prevented them from minstering to certain people. the judge's decision is expected to be appealed by both sides. >>> an american-born radical preacher was killed in yemen by an air strike this week. officials considered him a major terror threat to the united states. his anti-american sermons inspired several plots against the u.s. ethicists and religion voices raised questions about whether the killing violated law or denied his right to due process. on our website we have a segment on the ethical issues raised by the use of drones. the council considered the palestinian request for independent state. it'
'm mindy basara. >> and i'm stan stovall. thank you for joining us this morning. >> i hope to have some good weather news after the game last night. >> weather-wise, it will be nice this afternoon. plenty of sunshine in the picture. a chilly start. this is the end of october. 48 at the airport. a touch of fog in some neighborhoods. that should burn off pretty quickly. mostly sunny and pleasant. high temperature in the upper 60's. that is above average for this time of year. things will change by the end of the week. first we say good morning to sarah. >> we're tracking a few palms, one impacting a major road on the beltway. an accident near the j.f.x. -- we're tracking a few problems. the j.f.x. looks good into town. dorsey road and aviation, we're checking on an accident. 63 on the north side and bel air road. moving well over towards the west side. you may find some delays over towards the j.f.x. with that accident. we start near greenspring. we're watching to see if any delays start to form. we will monitor that shot for you. 95 out of white marsh, a building in volume. that is the l
late steve jobs. thank you for talking to us this evening. >> that does it for us tonight. i'm ezra klein. rachel will be back tomorrow. follow me on twitter at twitter.com/ezra klein. it is now time for "the ed show." good night. >>> good evening, americans. welcome to "the ed show." from new york, the 99% are out protesting across the country. today president obama acknowledged the occy wall street movement and the potential affect it might have on the next election. but herman cain didn't seem to get the message and is calling them un-american. this is "the ed show." let's get to work. >> i would with love nothing more than to see congress act so aggressively that i can't campaign against them as a do-nothing congress. >> reporter: the president is hammering republicans on jobs and republicans continue to attack the 99% movement. >> if you don't have a job and you are not rich, blame yourself. >> tonight, van jones, laura flander and john nichols on today's occupy protests. house republicans refuse to condemn rick perry's name hunting camp and rick perry is speaking out on the is
using their cars in the first place. it is great to keep as many spaces as possible because everyone still drive their cars. i feel like it is not as important when the purpose is to get people on the bike, like do not worry about the spot because it will work itself out one way or another. people will not be driving as much. one more thing, i was reading about the funding, and there is the -- [bell rings] commissioner buell: that is the 30-second warning. >> the transportation fund for clean air, i feel like that is completely within the realm to support this project. and do it. thank you. >> justin and ike. >> good morning, commissioners. my name is justin. my family and i live in the mission, and we do not own a car, and we get around by bicycle as much as possible. my wife and i take our 3-year- old daughter on bikes, and we go through golden gate park. we're members of the california academy of sciences. we go do there. we go to birthday parties. we use jfk drive to get to ocean beach for beach days. so i am is strongly in support of this project. we need to do everything we can
morning. i am jennifer franciotti at. >> i am stan stovall. thank you for joining us this morning. >> i will take the cooler temperatures to lose the rain. >> it will be chilly but dry. will be kind of a windy day. a cold front is going through right now. 62 are out at the airport. the wind is starting to pick up. a mixture of sun and clouds. about a 30% chance for a shower this morning. the wind is a bigger story. high temperature in the 60's. we will come back and detail the forecast for the weekend. first we say good morning to sarah. >> we start with the most recent accident at harford road south of 152. you may start to see some delays. if you travel out of the northeast on 95 down towards the white marsh area, you will tap the brakes just a bit. in terms of other problems, we have an accident at coldspring and greenspring. so far so good on the west side. 140 reisterstown, fire activity. another problem involving a water main break. sacred heart is closed. in the white marsh area, you can see the volume is picking up. we had two accidents and they have been cleared on the eastboun
into debt. dean reynolds tells us why some believe it will only get worse. and in a state with high unemployment, ben tracy on why there are thousands of jobs with no workers to fill them. captioning sponsored by cbs this is the "cbs evening news" with scott pelley. >> pelley: good evening. from the emerald city. at a time when there is so much anger in the streets of america over wall street greed and corporate corruption, we begin tonight with one of the biggest wall street insider trading cases ever. at a time when many americans were losing their 401(k)s, prosecutors say rajat gupta was leaking secret corporate information to a hedge fund tycoon so that that tycoon's fund wouldn't suffer the same fate. gupta was in a perfect position to do that inside the board rooms of some of the country's biggest corporations. the result, prosecutors say, was that the hedge fund made millions while ordinary americans got soaked. justice correspondent bob orr has our story. >> reporter: as a board more february proctor & gamble, and goldman sachs, rajat gupta regularly heard sensitive corporat
are going to bangladesh already with the cost of chinese labor going up. china uses its currency manipulation against our topnotch manufacturers. the large companies say nothing because most of them have plants in china so they can get around it. but middle and small-sized manufacturers are up against this wall and are desperate for our help. one manufacturer in upstate new york makes a very advanced product that deals with cleaning pollutants as they go through a power system. it's a topnotch product. and this manufacturer employs a couple of hundred people in upstate new york. said to me china is stealing my stuff even though i have patents and other things on it. they're stealing the method biby we do that. i could live with that if they just sold the stuff in china. we're not big enough to export all around the world. but what they do is not only do they steal our intellectual property on this, but then they come back and sell it in america at a 30% discount because of currency manipulation. he said how am i going to compete with that? there's story after story after story ju
2012 presidential race with lenny curry and delicate u.s. efforts to encourage foreign- based businesses to open in united states with nancy mclernon, president of the national law the organization for business investment. w j" is next. -- "washington journal" is next. host: good morning parade joe lieberman at connecticut and susan colin of maine say that congress should freeze the pay of federal employees for the third year, saying that it would save about $32 billion. also in the papers this morning, citing cost is a concern, the white house has dropped a vision of health care law that would provide a lifetime benefit in the event of illness or disability. it is known as the class act being dropped by the administration. and its role in the larger health-care law. we want your thoughts on this decision by the white house. if you want to give us a call, the numbers are on the screen. if you want to send us an e- mail, make your thoughts on -- thoughts known by that. journal@cspan.org, and if you are familiar with twitter and can keep your comments to 140 characters are less,
to get on the right road. >> and they are. and u.s. firms are very, very far along to meeting those new standards. >> do you have confidence that the european banks and the regulators there will comply with basel iii, the spirit as well as the letter of it? >> >> well, we're going to do everything they can to make sure they do, of course. and as i say, we have the time to try to make sure we're confident that's going to happen because these rules only start to bite over the next several years. and so we're working very hard to insure we have better protections in place. >> uh-huh. mr. secretary, do you know of any financial institution, and you've been around a while, that has had, that has been adequately, in other words -- and i don't say -- well capitalized and have liquidity that has failed? >> that's like a, that's a very interesting question. um, i think that in a, in a really systemic financial crisis just to think back to the experience of this country in 2008, for example, it certainly was the case from the great depression and other examples of this stuff, you can have a situa
of sciences. we go do there. we go to birthday parties. we use jfk drive to get to ocean beach for beach days. so i am is strongly in support of this project. we need to do everything we can to make cycling safer, especially in the park. it anywhere in the city, and the park. i really think this will help encourage other families to also use their bicycles as well. so thank you for hearing this issue, and i strongly hope you supported. thank you. commissioner buell: thank you. >> bob. >> i am bob, and i oppose this design as it is now. it has not done adequate safety analysis. plus, it has not really done out reach appropriate for people with energy and functional limitations. having an evening meeting works against people who are transit- dependent. you have to walk a long distance from a bus stop to get there. so to say you had public outreach is somewhat irrelevant to some limited constituencies. i want to remind you of an early slide you showed, the one about chicago, where is working. if you go back to that sly, you'll see that there is a bicyclist in the wide buffer zone. so right away,
of the injuries warranted being transported by helicopter. >> joining us on the telephone is dave carbon, he was right in the area when the train crashed, just camping nearby. dave, give us a little about your vantage point and what you saw. >> well, i was out here fishing and i heard a train go by like normal. and we heard a sound like we would never forget and we ran over there and saw the wreck. >> what did it look like? >> the trailer looked like a bomb went off. it was in a million pieces. the rear wheels were at least 150 yards away down the tracks. there was corn feed all over the place. >> right now you're at the scene. in terms of injuries and all the ambulances, we're seeing the video now. can you describe what you're seeing of the injured people on board? >> the police made us back up, but i've seen ambulances coming and going since the accident. a couple i believe were helicoptered out. >> and one last question, how close are you camping? where is your camp site in relation to this accident? >> i'm close enough that after i heard the crash hit, i ran over there and the corn that
show do creator is here to talk about it all. >> great to have you with us. thank you for watching "the ed show." herman cain launched another tirade against the 99% movement. the former ceo of godfather's pizza blasted him last night. according to the associated press, herman cain called the occupy wall street protesters un-american. the pizzaman doesn't have a clue because he hasn't been there while herman cain has been touring the country on his presidential campaign/book tour i've been out there with the folks and i know they are not un-american. i'll let you be the judge. >> what this is the 99%. this is the vast majority of the american people. >> capital of the world is getting a lot of attention right now in terms of the mistreatment and the unfair burden that's being placed on working families. >> why are you i here? >> to tax the rich. tax the rich. they are not paying their fair share. >> they are not paying their fair share. i want our money back. >> there are republicans and this is not about a party. this is about a movement to take it back to the people. >> i'm here becau
>>> good morning, america. this morning, october blast. it is not a trick. and for many of us, not a treat. a monster storm barreling up into the northeast this morning, with the biggest and earliest snowfall in more than a century. major cities in the crosshairs, as we head into a white halloween. >>> true survival. after six, long days lost in the wilderness, an 8-year-old autistic boy is found alive. no food and temperatures near freezing. how did he survive so long, all alone? >>> desperate decision. a mother's worst fear realized. trapped by a fire. she's forced to drop her two, young children out of a third floor window to the neighbors below. how did she work up the courage to do this? she's going to talk with us exclusively this morning. >>> and miracle pup. they tried to put him down but he survived. how did little daniel the dog cheat death? we'll meet him live right here in our studio this morning. >>> and we've got him live with us in the studio this morning. this is a huge get for us. daniel the dog. there he is. he's got a sweater on, looking chipper. >> looking
. >> carter evans. weren't you going to tell us about a green job? just give us one suggestion. >> yes, a great job, best jobs for saving the world, public schoolteach schoolteacher. this is part of the cnnmoney.com series. theseries. median pay, $50,000 a year. >> not exactly a great job, but a job that may save the world anyway. carter evans, many thanks. >>> "american morning" continues right now. >>> a brazen terror plot foiled. i'm ali velshi. the u.s. accusing iran of conspiring with mexican drug lords to kill a saudi ambassador on american soil. a bold scheme raising tensions between the two countries and putting american travelers on high alert. >>> mitt romney rising. i'm christine romans. the republican candidate solidifying his front-runner position in the latest republican debate while. >>> and forcing to use tear gas to control rioting inmates. i'm carol costello on this "american morning." -- captions by vitac -- www.vitac.com >>> good morning. it is wednesday, october 12th. welcome to "american morning," and it is a busy one. >> sure is. politics and this amazing terror
are coming home from iraq for good in a few weeks. a special good morning to the men and women watching us on the american forces network all around the world, thank you for what you do. we are going to start with herman cain this morning, under fire from his republican rivals. this time for recent comments he made about abortion. and what a platform they had to take shots at him last night. a major gathering of christian conservatives in iowa. shannon travis is in des moines. >> reporter: a big night here in des moines, iowa. the iowa faith and freedom coalition, a gathering of 1,000 iowans, many of them christian evangelicals. six presidential candidates came to court their vote. rick perry, michele bachmann, rick santorum, ron paul, newt gingrich and herman cain. herman cain was on the hot seat because of comments he made to our very own piers morgan earlier this week. he was talking about the issue of abortion. he made very clear, unequivocally, he's pro-life, but asked about what about in cases of rape or incest and his answer was interpreted by some people by leaving some room he wou
the attack on the u.s.q embassy in kabul. an update live from afghanistan in just a moment. >>> also, u.s. voters could be going from the shopping malls this holiday seasonÑi directly the voting booths. new hampshire, now threatening to move its first in the nation presidential primary to disease? why? blame florida for this one, we'll explain. >> and more cases ofok infectio and deaths relatedlp to that cantalourw recall. an important recall for you this morning. you cani] still get sick from tainted cantaloupe you ate two monthsr hello to you all. i'm t.j. holmes,xd 9:00 a.m. he inlp atlanta. let's start at the top of the season. a major player in the battle against u.s. troops inlo afghanistan, his name is hajee malee kahn. he's said to have been behind the attack on the u.s. embassy in kabul next month. troops guarding the embassy battles these insurgent attackers for almost 20 hours straight. let me bring inok ourq nick pey loss. or me int( w3kabul. can you start with who this guy is and why he is a big deal. >>e1 this is the operational leader forq a group in afghanistan, we're t
did not call his kids. >> oh, my god would never not call his kids. there is four of us. by the time, the fourth day, fifth day and sixth day, we knew something was wrong. >> reporter: so the children started searching on their own, pinpointing an area in california's ang lus national forest. the brothers and sisters with other family and friends began driving. >> we stopped at every ravine and looked over every hill. >> all of a sudden i just thought i heard a cat or a dog enough where i just said hello and it echoed down the hill. >> shawn lavau found his father thursday. the 67-year-old man had been missing for six days. >> i hugged him and we both cried, and i said, you know, how did you make it? and he said i drank the water in the river and i ate leaves and bugs. >> he was heading this direction. another car was heading towards him. had bright lights on so he flashed the lights on the car. i believe at that point probably swerved, went off the road. >> david lavau ended up right next to another wrecked car with a decomposing body inside. the los angeles times reports he wrote o
to pay the rest of us $3.50 an hour in the 1960's. host: you can also send us e- mail at journal@c-span.org. this is the scene from times square. that is the nasdaq symbol, not far from broadway and became crown zero and the new york rallies go across the globe. here is a story, that the world wide protest were not court netted but not quite spontaneous. -- coordinated but not quite spontaneous. that essentially summarizes what happened over the weekend inside the "new york times" and robert joins us from of rhode island. caller: where it should be heading is that we have all of these people unemployed due to jobs being sent overseas. they should bring them back for the same about money, and i can almost guarantee you -- i am an accountant -- they could manufacture those jobs here in the united states, give people a living wage, give them pensions and fringe benefits and put people back to work. just like the person they call before, who has the skills in textiles, items like that. put them back to work by starting to open up those close the factories, and using american workers.
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